Upcoming Lectures

  • No upcoming lectures have been scheduled yet.

Past Lectures

  • 2019 Marston Lecture in Geography: Jane Lubchenco - Tackling wicked environmental problems with complex-adaptive-systems thinking
  • 2019 Distinguished Professor Lecture: Clare Reimers - Carbon cycling at the seafloor: 40 years of advancing science
  • 2018 Thomas Condon Lecture: Kenneth Ridgway - Earth science & communities: Great earthquakes to wild rice   (general public lecture)
  • 2018 George Moore Lecture: Kenneth Ridgway - Cenozoic flat-slab subduction processes and the tectonic development of southern Alaska   (technical lecture)
  • 2018 New Horizon Lectures: Kelly M. Brunt - ICESat-2: Ice sheets and beyond
  • 2018 Distinguished Visiting Lecture: Rebecca Moore - Earth’s vital signs: Planetary-scale environmental monitoring with Google Earth Engine
  • 2018 Distinguished Professor Lecture: Edward Brook - The history of the atmosphere and climate from polar ice cores: Is past prologue?
  • 2018 Distinguished Visiting Lecture: Ellen Stofan - Understanding volcanism on Venus: Implications for habitable worlds   (technical lecture)
  • 2018 Distinguished Visiting Lecture: Ellen Stofan - Searching for life beyond Earth: From Mars to the ocean worlds of the outer solar system   (general public lecture)
  • 2017 Distinguished Professor Lecture: Alan Mix - Past dials future: Potential climate tipping points and their impacts in a warming world
  • 2017 Hydrothermal vents - Three short lectures by Jack Corliss and Robert Collier, Bill Chadwick, and Andrew Thurber
  • 2016 Going beyond: Setting an epic world record   by Colin O'Brady
  • 2016 Marston Lecture in Geography: Alexander B. Murphy - The integration struggle in Europe: Geographical considerations
  • 2016 Taubeneck Lecture: Leif Karlstrom - Plumbing and eruptive tempos of continental flood basalt provinces
  • 2016 Thomas Condon Lecture: John Grotzinger - Curiosity's mission of exploration at Gale Crater, Mars
  • 2016 Distinguished Professor Lecture: Peter Clark - Sea level rise due to global warming: Next 100 to 10,000 years
  • 2016 Hydrothermal Vent Discovery Lecture: Deborah Kelley - The lost city hydrothermal field
  • 2016 Hydrothermal Vent Discovery Lecture: Deborah Kelley - Research opportunities using the cabled observatory off the Oregon coast
  • 2016 Distinguished Visiting Lecture: Jessica Tierney - The Green Sahara revisited   (technical lecture)
  • 2016 Distinguished Visiting Lecture: Jessica Tierney - Pirates, famine, and El Niño: The Horn of Africa under a changing climate   (general public lecture)
  • 2016 Pulling back the curtain: A behind-the-scenes look at the changing world of journalism
  • 2016 Thomas Condon Lecture: Ellen Morris Bishop - Oregon's climates through time – stories in the stones
  • 2015 Sustaining global fisheries production: What does it take?   by Ray Hilborn
  • 2015 Inaugural Marston Lecture in Geography: Richard A. Marston - Physical geography and geographic information science in environmental management: Past lessons and prospects for the future
  • 2015 Distinguished Visiting Lecture: Julie Brigham-Grette - Tracing arctic climate evolution: From a forested arctic to the present
  • 2015 Two lectures by Rita R. Colwell - Just because you are a pawn, you do not have to lose the game and Oceans, human health and infectious disease: The story of a marine bacterium, Vibrio cholerae
  • 2015 Hydrothermal Vent Day Lecture: Anna-Louise Reysenbach - Deep-sea hot springs: Challenging our understanding of life on Earth and elsewhere
  • 2014 Thomas Condon Lecture: Tullis C. Onstott - Carbon cycling in the deep subsurface: Never was so much owed by so many to so few   (technical lecture)
  • 2014 George Moore Lecture: Tullis C. Onstott - The hidden universe   (general public lecture)
  • 2014 Distinguished Visiting Lecture: Jerry Mitrovica - Postmodern geophysics and ice age climate   (technical lecture)
  • 2014 Distinguished Visiting Lecture: Jerry Mitrovica - Taking the fingerprints of global sea level rise   (general public lecture)
  • 2013 Distinguished Visiting Lecture: Lynne Talley and Jeff Severinghaus - Air bubbles in ice, salt in the sea: What geochemistry can tell us about climate change
  • 2013 Five tools of moral reasoning for climate scientists   by Kathleen Dean Moore and Michael P. Nelson
  • 2006 Distinguished Professor Lecture: Patricia A. Wheeler - The Arctic Ocean: Early exploration, recent scientific expeditions and impending climate impacts

Condon Lectures, Oregon State University

The Oregon State Board of Higher Education established the Condon Lectureship in 1944 to honor Thomas Condon (1822-1907), the first professor of geology in Oregon.

Thomas Condon immigrated to New York from Ireland in 1833 at the age of 11. In 1852, he sailed from the east coast around Cape Horn with a new bride, a new degree from Auburn Theological Seminary, and a calling for teaching and missionary work in Oregon. While pursuing this calling, however, Condon discovered the world of geology, and he became a scientist of national and international stature. He discovered the John Day Fossil Beds, and this led to a strong interest in fossil evidence for the theory of evolution. From the John Day area, Condon supplied the specimens of three-toed horses that completed the evolutionary lineage from the Eocene five-toed (and dog-sized) horse to the present one-toed horse. Charles Darwin later referred to this work as the best support for the theory of evolution since The Origin of Species.

Condon first recognized the correct Tertiary age of the Oregon Coast Range, previously considered to be Precambrian, and he named the Astoria Formation, richly fossiliferous at the Oregon Coast. He was Oregon’s first state geologist, and he remained active in teaching in the state college system until his 83rd year.

Throughout his career, Condon used the free public lecture as a method for disseminating scientific knowledge to the general public. He gave many lectures near his cottage on the beach at Newport, with the promontory of Jumpoff Joe as a backdrop.

The purpose of the Condon Lectures is to interpret the results of significant scientific research for the non-specialist. Some of the distinguished lecturers in this series are listed below.

  • Kenneth Ridgway
  • Barbara Sherwood Lolar
  • John Grotzinger
  • Ellen Morris Bishop
  • Tullis Onstott
  • Richard W. Carlson
  • Robert Hazen
  • Richard Alley
  • Steven Squyres
  • Susan Solomon*
  • Stephen Sparks
  • Luis Chiappe
  • Lynn Orr
  • Kerry Sieh
  • Ross S. Stein
  • Joseph Kirschvink
  • Marcia McNutt
  • Tanya Atwater
  • James L. Kirkland
  • J. William Schopf
  • Norman Myers
  • Richard G. Klein
  • John Imbrie
  • Eugene M. Shoemaker
  • William R. Dickinson
  • Paul F. Hoffman
  • W. Gary Ernst
  • Walter Alvarez
  • David G. Howell
  • Gerald J. Wasserburg
  • J. Craig Wheeler
  • F. Sherwood Rowland*
  • David Arnett
  • Don L. Anderson
  • Don Johanson
  • James Arnold
  • William A. Fowler*
  • Robert A. Hinde
  • Jacob Bronowski
  • Sol Saporta
  • Rene Jules Dubos
  • Melvin Calvin
  • Sir Wilfrid E. Le Gros Clark
  • Paul B. Sears
  • Robert Oppenheimer
  • George Gaylord Simpson
  • Perry Byerly
  • Kenneth Scott Latourette
  • Fay-Cooper Cole
  • Marvin Minsky
  • Carl Sagan
  • Aaron C. Waters
  • Sherwood L. Washburn
  • Sir Bernard Lovell
  • Robert P. Sharp
  • Otto Struve
  • George W. Beadle
  • Ralph Buchsbaum
  • Robert J. Braidwood
  • Felix M. Keesing
  • Ralph W. Chaney
  • Howell Williams

* Nobel Laureate